CLEAR LOGO

IS THE CAMPAIGN FOR MANDATORY AND CLEAR FOOD LABELLING.

Join us to ask for method of production food labelling in the UK, for all types of food, wherever you are, whatever you eat.

ABOUT 

C.L.E.A.R. is the Consortium for Labelling for the Environment, Animal welfare, and Regenerative farming. C.L.E.A.R. exists to campaign for clear and mandatory food labelling in the United Kingdom.

At present, the consortium consists of 40 farming, food, animal welfare, environmental, social civic societies and businesses, and growing, representing a diverse range of ecological, social, and governance interests and expertise.

CAMPAIGNS FOR

A system of mandatory food labelling for the United Kingdom which:

  • functions as an overarching labelling system for all types of food, domestically produced and imported, and at all point of purchase

  • includes information on the method of production - how the animals and plants have been grown, reared, and processed

  • extends the country of origin labelling requirements to include all raw and processed foods

  • establishes a set of regulated definitions of key terms relating to the ethical or sustainable method of production 

  • is based on consultation with key stakeholders. A commission with diverse interest and expertise should be established to work with the government to produce a roadmap with integrated implementation strategies

WHY IS                 IMPORTANT?

At present, there are:

NO legal safeguards in place to stop British farmers from being undercut by lower standard imports or to support high health, animal welfare, ecological and labour standards in the UK

NO mandatory labelling requirements to provide information on the method of production for all types of food, wherever it is bought

C.L.E.A.R. believes that, in order to understand how our food choices impact nature, animal welfare, our health, and the well-being and livelihoods of farmers and everyone in the food supply chain, we need food labels that tell us how our food is farmed, grown, reared and processed.

So ALL of US can make informed food choices.

Consumers will have clear and fact-based information to make informed purchasing decisions at all points of purchasing

Farmers and producers will have the support to be able to distinguish themselves from other farmers and producers with lower standards of production, including competitors from abroad 

Retailers will be released from the technical challenges and financial burden to produce their own standards of labelling

Out-of-home/ hospitality sector will be released from the technical challenges and financial burden to produce their own standards of labelling to relay the information to customers

Government will find C.L.E.A.R.’s objectives to be supporting the UK’s environmental and social policies and targets

THE TOP 3 PROBLEMS WITH THE CURRENT VOLUNTARY FOOD STANDARDS LABELLING

  1. Poorly produced or cheap food is often not labelled by means of production and this lack of information discriminates against those who are constrained by time or money

  2. Farming and food businesses with the worst environmental and animal welfare practices are not required to label their method of production and therefore hide their practices from the public 

  3. Food labels sometimes actively mislead and are unclear

CONSORTIUM

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“The Soil Association advocates for a transition to a more sustainable, agroecological food system that supports climate, nature and health. To be able to make better choices for the planet we need to know how our food is produced. Through clear method of production labelling, producers who are taking steps towards better meat production have the opportunity to communicate this directly to the customer. This makes informed purchasing decisions possible and can support a transition to a more sustainable food system.”

Laura Chan, Soil Association

CONTACT US

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